Mari Lowe Center for Comparative Oncology Research

3800 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104

Basic
Research

Translational
Research

Clinical
Research

Fundamental research in veterinary oncology aims to improve our understanding of basic mechanisms of cancer in animal and human patients. Studies conducted by members of the Center are gaining significant insight into understanding the molecular, cellular and whole organism-based mechanisms of processes that contribute to cancer development and could be targeted for its treatment. These relevant areas include regulation of cell cycle, transcription factors and gene expression, cell energy metabolism, DNA repair, cell motility, oncogenes, tumor microenvironment, tumor cytokines, signal transduction and hormonal responses.

For therapeutic advances in human and veterinary oncology to occur novel findings related to the basic cellular mechanisms involved in the initiation and progression of cancer need to be translated from the bench to the bedside through the development of therapeutically relevant hypotheses that can be tested in a clinically relevant setting. The genome sequence of the dog is closely related to that of man and serves to emphasize the potential benefit of studying dogs with spontaneously occurring cancer in identifying disease genes and evaluating response to novel therapies that will advance both human and veterinary cancer therapy. Researchers at PennVet are actively translating basic scientific discoveries in the field of cancer biology and immunology into therapies that are being evaluated in on-going clinical trials.

Clinical research in oncology is supported by the large caseload of cancer patients at the Ryan Veterinary Hospital. Continued clinical research is needed to identify more effective cancer treatments to further improve the outcomes and quality of life in many cancer patients—and knowledge gained from this research will improve our understanding of cancer itself. Clinical research with veterinary patients can provide valuable information that may lead to improved understanding and treatment of both human and animal cancers. If current treatments lack safety or efficacy, new treatments are investigated through clinical trials.

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